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Is there a ‘Straight Pride’ flag?

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Since the late ‘70s, pride flags have become a powerful symbol of community, inclusivity, and acceptance. From the first rainbow flag in 1978 to the many flags that now represent the wide spectrum of identities in the LGBTQIA+ community, pride flags represent diversity, love, and the ongoing fight for visibility and equality. 

Now, it’s no secret that heteronormative society has historically stood in the way of the LGBTQIA+ community’s rights for equality, which is why it’s so confusing and controversial that there would be a “straight pride” flag, because what oppression are straight people fighting against, exactly? Read on for everything you need to know about the straight pride flag, its history and reception, and in contrast, the straight ally flag. 

What is the Straight Flag?

A generic “straight flag” is composed of alternating black and white horizontal stripes. It’s similar to the traditional rainbow LGBTQIA+ pride flag, just without the color. 

It’s not clear when and where the first straight flag originated, but there are a few infamous versions that have caused a fuss in recent years. 

The Russian Straight Pride Flag

In July of 2015 (and in response to the United States’ legalization of gay marriage the month prior), the Russian political party United Russia—which Vladimir Putin was a part of—unveiled a straight pride flag for Peter and Fevronia Day, which celebrates family, love, and fidelity. 

The flag displayed a man, woman, and their three children with the hashtag #НастоящаяCемья (“#RealFamily”). Totally normal thing to put on a flag, nothing to see here! The flag was meant to represent the nuclear family and traditional Russian values. 

The flag was criticized by rights groups as a continuation of the Russian authorities’ attempts to oppress public expressions of support for the LGBTQIA+ community. 

New Brunswick, Canada’s Straight Pride Flag 

In October of 2018, the small village of Chipman, New Brunswick was polarized by a straight pride flag

The flag, which depicts interlocking male and female symbols on a black and white striped background, was up for a day before it was taken down due to backlash. Thank God!

Boston’s Straight Pride Parade  

In 2019, alt-right group Super Happy Fun America (SHFA) hosted a Straight Pride Parade in Boston.

Promotional material for the parade included a straight flag showcasing a blue triangle and a pink triangle with interlocking male and female symbols. These straight flags (and other versions) were waved proudly during the parade alongside American flags and Trump banners. Go figure! 

The event’s co-organizer, John Hugo told Vox, “Perhaps one day straights will be honored with inclusion and the acronym will be LGBTQS. Until that time, we have no other choice but to host our own events.”

The “Super Straight” Movement and Super Straight Flag 

In 2021, a TikToker named Kyle Royce coined the term “super straight” because, as he explained, he was tired of being called “transphobic” for not wanting to date trans women

Royce further explained that “super straight” is a “new sexuality” (that feeling when your sexuality is “transphobic”). “I’ve made a new sexuality,” he said in his now-deleted TikTok. “Straight men get called transphobic because I wouldn’t date a trans woman. Now, I’m super straight. I only date the opposite gender, women, that are born women. So you can’t say I’m transphobic now because that is just my sexuality.”

The video spread to 4chan, Reddit, and Twitter, with alt-right and neo-Nazi online trolls spreading the poison of the super straight movement. Memes were made, as was a “super straight” flag which was composed of a half-black, half-orange background reminiscent of the Pornhub logo, with interlocking male and female symbols in the foreground. 

The Straight Ally Flag 

If you’ve made it this far, congrats! Now for some good news. 

Unlike the straight pride flags you’ve just read about, the straight ally flag is not rooted in homophobia, transphobia, and general hate. The straight ally flag is meant to represent straight allies, which are people who stand up for the LGBTQIA+ community. 

The straight ally flag is composed of a rainbow-colored A (or inverted V) on top of a background of black and white horizontal stripes. While “straight flags” are broadly pretty unnecessary, the straight ally flag—depicting support—stands in stark contrast to “straight pride” flags.

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